Trainee Writer

Adventures of a screenwriter in training…

Competition: It’s good for the soul.


As my regular readers will know – thank you for being a regular reader, by the way – I’m something of an oddity among screenwriters, because my main goal, my focus as an artist (that sounds pretentious, but writing is art, okay?) isn’t primarily on the golden ticket, the cash cow that is feature films. That isn’t to say that I don’t or can’t write them. After all, the principle is roughly the same with both media. But I’m one of the breed that would rather write for television than see my name stuck in the small print at the bottom of a movie poster every couple of years.

The trouble with being a television writer is how little support there actually is for the budding television writer. There are thousands more guides to writing for features than television out there, both on the web and in bookstores. There are arguably more opportunities to break into features in an age where everybody with a digital camera can become a director-producer-whatever else you want to hyphenate in there.

In television, you write thousands of specs, mail them out to anyone with a postal address who might vaguely know someone who occasionally does catering on the set of Days Of Our Lives in the hope that someone, anyone up there will read it and decide you’ve got what it takes. You call and e-mail hundreds of agents, literary or otherwise, hoping that one of them will say that they’ll read it and represent you. You get an unfathomable amount of rejections.

There are so many independent movie production companies at this time that if you shop a half-way decent 90 page script for long enough, someone will option it for way below Guild minimum and produce it on a shoestring budget. You’ll see your name in lights, on that movie poster, but in reality, very few people will actually see the fruits of your labour.

Despite that, the feature writer is rewarded, supported and encouraged. Not just by their thousands of peers on wonderful sites such as Triggerstreet and Zoetrope, but by the hundreds of people out there willing to run (and sponsor) competitions that offer the budding feature writer some much-needed affirmation.

In television, we don’t have that support. Going from the top of my head, the only two television pilot contests I’m aware of are the excellent TVWriter.com “People’s Pilot” contest and the ongoing Storyboard.tv contests, which have received mixed reviews. Aside from that… nothing. Some film festivals – usually the minor ones – offer contests for television writing, but at the cost of extortionate entry fees with no real benefit of exposure from them. There are plenty of festivals for produced television pilots, too. But nobody really offers the humble television writer the chance to get that positive affirmation.

With that in mind, within the coming hours I intend to launch a television writing competition of my own. Sort of. It’s not strictly a contest in traditional terms – there’s no cash prize, there’s no option or production deal on offer. The prize is something arguably more valuable: exposure.

For this contest, there will be no entry fee and no exaggerated promises. There is no deadline. You will receive feedback from me for your entries and you can enter as many times as you like. If I like what I read, I’ll post my review on the blog for the world to see and make the script available to download.

Why does that benefit you? Frankly, I’m something of a publicity whore. Every time I post to my blog, I pimp the link all over the net: On Zoe, on Twitter, on Facebook and to over 1000 industry professionals by posting the link to the various groups on LinkedIn of which I’m a member.

By the time you read this, I’ll either be in the process of or have already finished adding a page to this website giving all the competition details. The contest will be open to entries in the form of 30-minute sitcoms (pilots and specs), hour-long dramas (pilot and spec) and 30-minute soap operas (pilot and spec.) I’ll read anything written for television, with the exception of MOWs – you can enter those in most feature contests – as long as it’s in English. Though I may also consider scripts in French, Spanish and German (e-mail first to check, they’ll take me much longer to read and review. Especially if you want the feedback in one of those languages!)

Submissions are being accepted NOW. Click here for details.

I look forward to reading your submissions.

Kriss

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August 2, 2011 - Posted by | Contests, screenwriting, specs, writing | , , , , ,

1 Comment »

  1. I really liked the article, and the very cool blog

    Comment by rtyecript | August 24, 2011 | Reply


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